Guatemala & Colombia: Spring 2013

Participants in this semester Cross-cultural will experience a window into the world of Guatemala (10 weeks) and Colombia (3 weeks) with their diversity of people, religion, culture, and economics.

EMU students will spend significant time with CASAS (Central American Study and Service), a cross-cultural study program in Guatemala. Participants will live with families in Guatemala City while studying Spanish during the first 8 weeks. Along with Spanish classes, students will investigate culture, history and current issues including immigration, trade and economics. We will have a special focus on peace-building efforts by Catholic, Protestant and Mayan groups. Attention will be given to relating to and understanding the Guatemalan/Mayan Anabaptist churches. Following this time of intensive Spanish study, students will participate in service learning in rural Guatemala. Planned travel in small groups will allow students to engage in independent learning within the region.

Traveling to Colombia offers the opportunity to compare history and culture of two countries in Latin America. In Colombia, Mennonite churches and service agencies will guide us toward understanding peace-building and the current Colombian realities.

Our EMU group will continually reflect on new relationships and understandings from the semester and discern individual/group responses.

Information

Estimated Cost: on campus tuition, room and board plus $1,200 travel fee (cost may be adjusted due to changes in currency exchange rates and air fares)
Semester Leaders: Ann Hershberger, Nursing Dept., and Jim Hershberger
Enrollment: 22 students
Credits: 15 semester hours

Course Descriptions

CCSSC 201 Cross-cultural Social Science 3SH
In both countries, students will live with families and study culture in context to learn skills of adaptation and empathy, as well as ability to critique one’s native and host cultures.

CCHIS 307 Latin American History 3SH
Students will study the highlights of Pre-Columbus, colonial, independence and contemporary periods. This will be the foundation for our understanding of current events and the strengths and challenges in the host countries and region.

CCREL 307 Religion in Society 3SH (CIW)
This interdisciplinary course will emphasize the interaction between: Catholic, Protestant (including Mennonite), and Indigenous faith expressions; the current political and economic climate; peacebuilding initiatives; and local music, literature, and art.

Spanish Language: Two of the following courses, placement based on previous knowledge:
CCSPA 110, 120 Elementary Spanish I & II 6 SH
CCSPA 210, 220 Intermediate Spanish I & II 6 SH
CCSPA 310, 320 Adv. Conversational Spanish I & II 6 SH


Required Immunizations

  • RoutineMMR, DPT series with last booster within 10 years, IPV or OPV, Hep B
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Typhoid – oral or injectable at least 3 weeks before travel
  • “Anti-malarial if indicated, see below”:
  • New Yellow fever recommendations: Recommended for all travelers ≥9 months of age traveling to areas <2,300 m in elevationd in the following departments (see Map 3-19): Amazonas, Antioquia, Arauca, Atlántico, Bolivar, Boyacá, Caldas, Caquetá, Casanare, Cauca, Cesar, Choco (only the municipalities of Acandí, Juradó, Riosucio, and Unguía), Códoba, Cundinamarca, Guainía, Guaviare, Huila, La Guajira (only the municipalities of Albania, Barrancas , Dibulla , Distracción , El Molino, Fonseca , Hatonuevo , La Jagua del Pilar , Maicao , Manaure , Riohacha , San Juan del Cesar , Urumita , and Villanueva ), Magdalena, Meta, Norte de Santander, Putumayo, Quindio, Risaralda, San Andrés and Providencia, Santander, Sucre, Tolima, Vaupés, and Vichada. Vaccination should be given 10 days before travel and at 10-year intervals if there is on-going risk.

Malaria risk in Colombia: risk in rural areas at altitudes <1,800 m (<5,906 ft). None in Bogotá and Cartagena.

Immunizations and prescriptions may be obtained at EMU Health Services by appointment.
Immunizations may also be obtained from your local health department or primary care provider.