“Martin Luther King’s Choices and Ours” – Dr. Vincent Harding

& Chapel Gathering in the Seminary, Seminary.

Dr. Vincent Harding engages a discussion around the themes of a quote by MLK and Matthew 25: 31 -40.

I choose to identify with the underprivileged.
I choose to identify with the poor.
I choose to give my life for the hungry.
I choose to give my life for those who have been left out of the sunlight of opportunity.
I choose to live for and with those who find themselves seeing life as a long and desolate corridor with no exit sign.
This is the way I’m going.
If it means suffering a little bit, I’m going that way.
If it means sacrificing, I’m going that way.
If it means dying for them, I’m going that way, because
I heard a voice saying, ‘Do something for others.’
           -Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.
Dr. Vincent Harding is a celebrated Civil Rights leader and scholar who was a close associate of Martin Luther King Jr. and the first director of the King Center in Atlanta. Harding also worked closely with Mennonites during the early 1960s, directing the “Mennonite House” in Atlanta from 1961-1964. In 1967, Harding drafted King’s important and controversial “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam” speech. He is the author of several books on the Civil Rights Movement, was the senior academic advisor for the PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize” series, and in 1997 he founded the Veterans of Hope Project which collects the stories of people who dedicated their lives to compassionate social change. In 2011 he engaged in a panel with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Sister Helen Prejean and this inspired his 2013 book, America Will Be!: Conversations on Hope, Freedom, and Democracy, co-authored with Buddhist leader Daisaku Ikeda.
The entire campus community is invited to every chapel service on campus. Eastern Mennonite Seminary hosts chapel gatherings in Martin Chapel every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 11:00.

“Is America Possible?” – Dr. Vincent Harding

& University Chapels.

In this evening lecture, Dr. Harding, a friend and confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., presents a guided discussion based on his years of experience with the Civil Rights movement, and on his recent thinking about compassion and the many forms of non-violent expression for social change.

Dr. Vincent Harding is a celebrated Civil Rights leader and scholar who was a close associate of Martin Luther King Jr. and the first director of the King Center in Atlanta. Harding also worked closely with Mennonites during the early 1960s, directing the “Mennonite House” in Atlanta from 1961-1964. In 1967, Harding drafted King’s important and controversial “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam” speech. He is the author of several books on the Civil Rights Movement, was the senior academic advisor for the PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize” series, and in 1997 he founded the Veterans of Hope Project which collects the stories of people who dedicated their lives to compassionate social change. In 2011 he engaged in a panel with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Sister Helen Prejean and this inspired his 2013 book, America Will Be!: Conversations on Hope, Freedom, and Democracy, co-authored with Buddhist leader Daisaku Ikeda.

“Loved into Life: a personal testimony” – Dr. Vincent Harding

& University Chapels.

The EMU history department and Black Student Union host Dr. Vincent Harding to share from his life and faith journey as part of the Keim Lecture Series and Black History Month. Dr. Harding was a friend and close associate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and a Mennonite pastor who visited EMU during the Civil Rights era. We are honored to again host him on campus.

Dr. Harding, a friend and confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., presents a guided discussion based on his years of experience with the Civil Rights movement, and on his recent thinking about compassion and the many forms of non-violent expression for social change.

Dr. Vincent Harding is a celebrated Civil Rights leader and scholar who was a close associate of Martin Luther King Jr. and the first director of the King Center in Atlanta. Harding also worked closely with Mennonites during the early 1960s, directing the “Mennonite House” in Atlanta from 1961-1964. In 1967, Harding drafted King’s important and controversial “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam” speech. He is the author of several books on the Civil Rights Movement, was the senior academic advisor for the PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize” series, and in 1997 he founded the Veterans of Hope Project which collects the stories of people who dedicated their lives to compassionate social change. In 2011 he engaged in a panel with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Sister Helen Prejean and this inspired his 2013 book, America Will Be!: Conversations on Hope, Freedom, and Democracy, co-authored with Buddhist leader Daisaku Ikeda.

“Rock. Lichen. Forest: Representing Biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest” – Steven Johnson

& University Colloquium Series.

Associate professor Steven Johnson, gives a presentation on his 12-13 sabbatical entitled “Rock. Lichen. Forest: Representing Biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest.”

“Desert Safaris for Reconciliation” – Dr. Salim Munayer

& University Chapels.

The Middle East is fraught with polarization. Yet in the midst of conflicts churches are often recognized as communities of forgiveness and reconciliation. For Dr. Salim Munayer bearing witness to the Gospel of reconciliation within the conflict is his passion.  In University Chapel, he speaks about this enormously challenging calling.

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Salim Munayer is an Arab-Palestinian Christian whose family was forced to flee their home, Lydda-Lod, in 1948. Like the Anabaptist/Baptist/Free Church Tradition, Salim’s Theology of Reconciliation offers a third way between the bipolar split of the western church’s conservative evangelicalism and protestant liberalism. Salim is on faculty at Bethlehem Bible College and is director of Musalaha – a dynamic peace-building program based out of Jerusalem.

On Musalaha’s homepage Salim says: “Conservative Western evangelicals tend to see the Middle East through the lens of religion. To many Westerners, Islam is frequently viewed as a threat since it is distinctively different and foreign in its expression. Islam is often perceived as anti-Christian, and the majority of problems in the Middle East are linked to Islam’s dominance in the region. These perceptions can lead to fear of Muslims, sometimes resulting in negative and racist attitudes toward Arab or Muslim people. At the other end of the spectrum, many liberal churches see current events in the Middle East as a byproduct of social changes such as modernization and urbanization, and they see radical Islam as a result of colonialism and imperialism…”

Salim’s theology is rooted in the reconciling work of Jesus on the cross. Salim’s mission is focused on building and reconciling relationships and, according to Salim, “most of Musalaha’s reconciliation work is between Israeli Messianic Jews and Palestinian Christians.”

Inside Athletics: February 22, 2014

& Faculty/Staff Speakers, Inside Athletics.

This week’s special edition of the Inside Athletics Podcast features the ODAC basketball tournament preview.  Dave’s guests are head men’s basketball coach, Kirby Dean and head women’s coach, Kevin Griffin.  With the men currently holding the #5 spot with one game remaining, they will host a first round game against the #12 team on Tuesday night with the winner going on to Salem for the quarterfinals on Friday.  Kirby talks about the gradual improvement of the Runnin’ Royals and their approach to the tournament.  He also gives his insights on the parity that exists among ODAC teams this year.  The women clinched the #1 spot in the tournament with a win at Shenandoah this week and will begin play next Thursday at 1pm.  Coach Griffin reflects on playing all season with “the bull’s eye” on their back and how the team has come together throughout the season, particularly after the loss of sharp-shooting Marla zumFelde.  He also shares his perspective on the tournament and what it will take to win it all.

Inside Athletics is a weekly podcast hosted by Director of Athletics, Dave King. The podcast offers a synopsis of what is happening in EMU athletics, but also delves deeper into how athletics at EMU shapes lives and enhances college educations by positively impacting an athlete’s understanding of self, others, and God. Sports Information Director James De Boer is a regular guest with EMU coaches and athletes making appearances as well.

 

CIE Lecture: “Experiences of a Palestinian Christian” – Salim Munayer

& Center for Interfaith Engagement.

A typical Western view is that Palestinian Christians feel threatened by Muslims, but the polling data shows that Palestinian Christians are emigrating because of hardships caused by the Israeli occupation. How does Christian Zionism impact the daily lives of Palestinians, and how has it created a disconnect between American churches and Palestinian Christians? What can we do to build relationships both here and there?

Salim Munayer is an Arab-Palestinian Christian whose family was forced to flee their home, Lydda-Lod, in 1948. Like the Anabaptist/Baptist/Free Church Tradition, Salim’s Theology of Reconciliation offers a third way between the bipolar split of the western church’s conservative evangelicalism and protestant liberalism. Salim is on faculty at Bethlehem Bible College and is director of Musalaha – a dynamic peace-building program based out of Jerusalem.

From Salim’s perspective, “Conservative Western evangelicals tend to see the Middle East through the lens of religion. To many Westerners, Islam is frequently viewed as a threat since it is distinctively different and foreign in its expression. Islam is often perceived as anti-Christian, and the majority of problems in the Middle East are linked to Islam’s dominance in the region. These perceptions can lead to fear of Muslims, sometimes resulting in negative and racist attitudes toward Arab or Muslim people. At the other end of the spectrum, many liberal churches see current events in the Middle East as a byproduct of social changes such as modernization and urbanization, and they see radical Islam as a result of colonialism and imperialism…”

Salim’s theology is rooted in the reconciling work of Jesus on the cross. Salim’s mission is focused on building and reconciling relationships and, according to Salim, “most of Musalaha’s reconciliation work is between Israeli Messianic Jews and Palestinian Christians.”

Check out this powerful video concerning Salim’s work.

For more info contact: Center for Interfaith Engagement,540-432-4674 or email interfaith@emu.edu

“The Gospel of Reconciliation in Dividied Israel-Palestine” – Dr. Salim Munayer

& University Chapels.

Dr. Salim Munayer, Director of Musalaha Ministry of Reconciliation.

The Middle East is fraught with polarization. Yet in the midst of conflicts churches are often recognized as communities of forgiveness and reconciliation. For Dr. Salim Munayer bearing witness to the Gospel of reconciliation within the conflict is his passion. In this Chapel Gathering in the Seminary, he speaks about this enormously challenging calling.
Salim Munayer is an Arab-Palestinian Christian whose family was forced to flee their home, Lydda-Lod, in 1948. Like the Anabaptist/Baptist/Free Church Tradition, Salim’s Theology of Reconciliation offers a third way between the bipolar split of the western church’s conservative evangelicalism and protestant liberalism. Salim is on faculty at Bethlehem Bible College and is director of Musalaha – a dynamic peace-building program based out of Jerusalem.

On Musalaha’s homepage Salim says: “Conservative Western evangelicals tend to see the Middle East through the lens of religion. To many Westerners, Islam is frequently viewed as a threat since it is distinctively different and foreign in its expression. Islam is often perceived as anti-Christian, and the majority of problems in the Middle East are linked to Islam’s dominance in the region. These perceptions can lead to fear of Muslims, sometimes resulting in negative and racist attitudes toward Arab or Muslim people. At the other end of the spectrum, many liberal churches see current events in the Middle East as a byproduct of social changes such as modernization and urbanization, and they see radical Islam as a result of colonialism and imperialism…”

Salim’s theology is rooted in the reconciling work of Jesus on the cross. Salim’s mission is focused on building and reconciling relationships and, according to Salim, “most of Musalaha’s reconciliation work is between Israeli Messianic Jews and Palestinian Christians.”

The entire campus community is invited to every chapel service on campus. Eastern Mennonite Seminary hosts chapel gatherings in Martin Chapel every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 11:00.

“Creating the Harmony: Hearing Young Women’s Voices at EMS & Beyond” – Maria Byler, Lana Miller

& Chapel Gathering in the Seminary, Faculty/Staff Speakers, Seminary, Student Speakers.

EMS student Maria Christine Meyer Byler and EMU Campus Pastor Lana Miller share stories and reflections about creating opportunities for young women to experience a call to ministry.

The entire campus community is invited to every chapel service on campus. Eastern Mennonite Seminary hosts chapel gatherings in Martin Chapel every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 11:00.

“SLW: Sharing Stories of Faith” – Kelsey Zook, Ann Hershberger, Diego Barahona, Jered Lyons

& Faculty/Staff Speakers, Spiritual Life Week, Student Speakers, University Chapels.

Kelsey Zook, Ann Hershberger, Diego Barahona, and Jered Lyons sghare parts of their faith stories. Each person shares their story in an interview style and then a theatrical group from campus does an improvisational retelling of each story after it is shared. We also hear stories of Biblical characters and their significant encounters with Jesus.