April 2020

LovEMU Day

Hall of Nations, University Commons

Join us for this fun day of friendly competition and help CJP win the departmental fund raising prize, during EMU’s annual LovEMU day celebrations. Check our LovEMU day website for more information.



May 2021

EMU Commencement

May 2 - Front Lawn, 1 p.m.

Check our Commencement page for updates.



CJP Celebration of Blessings

May 2 - Martin Chapel, Seminary, 4 p.m.

A special event for CJP graduates.



June 2021

CJP Registration

Friday, June 4:


Check-in

Fellowship Hall, Seminary Building, 2 – 10 p.m.


Picnic Supper

Thomas Plaza, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.


Opening Ceremony

Martin Chapel, Seminary Building, 8 – 9:30 p.m.

Welcome + remarks by Jayne Docherty, CJP executive director

Welcome + remarks by Susan Schultz Huxman, EMU president

Welcome Ceremony led by Katie Mansfield, Katia Ornelas Nunez and Ram Bhagat


Free Time

9:30 p.m.

Fire at the hill

Lit-up gazebo

Trips downtown


Saturday, June 5:


Breakfast

Cafeteria, Northlawn Residence Hall, 7 – 8:30 a.m.


Plenary event I

Martin Chapel, Seminary Building, 9 – 10:30 a.m.

sujatha baliga

sujatha baliga’s work is characterized by an equal dedication to crime survivors and people who’ve caused harm. A former victim advocate and public defender, baliga was awarded a Soros Justice Fellowship in 2008 which she used to launch a pre-charge restorative juvenile diversion program.

Today, through the Restorative Justice Project at Impact Justice, sujatha helps communities across the nation implement restorative justice alternatives to juvenile detention and zero-tolerance school discipline policies. She’s also dedicated to using this approach to end child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence. sujatha is a frequent guest lecturer at universities and conferences; she speaks publicly and inside prisons about her own experiences as a survivor of child sexual abuse and her path to forgiveness.

sujatha earned her A.B. from Harvard and Radcliffe Colleges, her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and has held two federal district court clerkships. sujatha has taught a seminar on restorative justice at Berkeley Law School; her personal and research interests include the forgiveness of seemingly unforgivable acts, survivor-led movements, restorative justice’s potential impact on racial disparities in our justice system, and Buddhist notions of conflict transformation. She is a 2019 MacArthur Fellow.

sujatha’s faith journey undergirds her justice work. A long-time Buddhist practitioner, she’s a lay member of the Gyuto Foundation, a Tibetan Buddhist Monastery in Richmond, Calif., where she leads meditation on Monday nights. She makes her home in Berkeley, Calif., with her partner of 22 years, Jason, and their 13-year-old child, Sathya.


John Paul Lederach

John Paul Lederach is Professor Emeritus of International Peacebuilding at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame and Senior Fellow at Humanity United. He works extensively as a practitioner in conciliation processes, active in Latin America, Africa, Southeast and Central Asia. He is widely known for the development of culturally appropriate approaches to conflict transformation and the design and implementation of integrative and strategic approaches to peacebuilding. He served as the director of the Peace Accord Matrix research initiative at the Kroc Institute and is active as a member of the Advisory Council for the recently formed Truth Commission in Colombia. He is author and editor of 24 books and manuals, including Building Peace: Sustainable Reconciliation in Divided Societies (US Institute of Peace Press) and The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace (Oxford University Press).


Break

Fellowship Hall, Seminary Building, 10:30 – 11 a.m.


Breakout sessions on theme of racial, economic, social and gender justice

11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Talibah Aquil: Ghana, remember me...

Mainstage Theater, University Commons

In spring 2019, Talibah Aquil, now CJP alumna and adjunct faculty, engaged in an arts based research project that centered on exploring healthy and holistic approaches to reimagining the “Identity Formation” of African Americans and people of the diaspora who are descendants of slavery. She journeyed to Ghana for the “Year of Return” and documented the lived experiences of people of the diaspora who decided to move to Ghana and how that transition and connection to their history has shaped how they now see themselves. Through the lens of poetry, music, dance and video, Talibah will share her own personal journey of self-discovery and healing during her time in Ghana.

While this presentation will encourage us to reflect on the 400 years since the first African was stolen from Ghana, it will also encourage us to reflect on our own identity and stories.


Sonya Shah: How do we walk our talk? Exploring restorative organizational practices

Discipleship Center

Sonya Shah initiated The Ahimsa Collectivein 2016. The Ahimsa Collective works to respond to harm in ways that foster wholeness for everyone. She is also an associate professor at the California Institute of Integral Studies. Central to her core values are nurturing community belonging and collective care, healing, compassion, love and transforming harm.

She is a Buddhist, a first-generation immigrant from the Northwestern part of India and feels most at home in nature. She has two amazing children who remind her what it means to be in love all of the time, and currently resides in northern California.


Nicole Litwiller: "It's Personal: Investigating [My] Whiteness." (Student led session)

Common Grounds + Gehman Gallery, University Commons

Nicole Litwiller’s goal for this project was to express to fellow white people that racism manifests within each person. To communicate this, Litwiller interviewed white people who are actively working to Undo Racism. Then, she wrote up the stories about their experiences with whiteness and Internalized Racial Superiority. She reflected on the stories and created paintings in response. (Not every story has a corresponding painting, but all stories are available for reading at the exhibit.)

As she conducted interviews, Litwiller heard parts of her own story in the stories of others. She is grateful to have learned so much about herself throughout the process. The project became far more personal than she anticipated; she finds that incredibly valuable. The process was a critical step in her journey.

Nicole Litwiller is a current Master of Arts student here at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding.


Amani Olugbala - Soul Fire Farm: Farming While Black

JAMAR CJP Classroom, LIB121, Library

Amani Olugbala, Community Educator at Soul Fire Farm, is a storyteller and food justice advocate with over 15 years of experience in youth education and community outreach. Amani combines artistic expression, project-based learning and outdoor education tools to facilitate social justice based workshops and discussions with individuals, groups and organizations. Amani seeks to push communities to challenge presumed differences and work together in uncovering interlocked paths towards self determination and community liberation. Amani’s early work with the Natural Leaders, Brother Yusuf and the Youth Ed Venture Network, underscored the necessity of reintroduction to land as a source of healing and power for those of us who have been historically and systematically disconnected.

Amani awoke a personal connection to seed while directing YO!, a youth-centered urban garden program in Albany, N.Y. At Soul Fire Farm’s Black and Latinx Farmer Immersion, Amani further cultivated the tools to sustain this connection and share it with others. Soul Fire Farm raises life-giving food to folks surviving food apartheid, trains farmer activists, advocates for systemic change and offers models for revolutionary thrival through love, ancestral wisdom and Earth reverence. Raptivist, spoken word artist, and abolitionist, Amani O+ is driven to uplift love, art & service as necessary expressions of rebellion against a sense of disconnection and hopelessness that threatens our collective peace and wellness.


Lunch

Cafeteria, Northlawn Residence Hall, 12:30 – 2 p.m.


Plenary event II, continuing on theme of racial, economic, social and gender justice

Martin Chapel, Seminary Building, 2 – 3:30 p.m.

The CJP founding and sustaining “mothers” panel



Top row from left: Ruth Zimmerman, Margaret Foth, Ann Hershberger, Pat Hostetter Martin
Bottom row from left: Gloria Rhodes, Jan Jenner, Janelle Myers-Benner, Carolyn Yoder

Ruth Zimmerman returned from eight years in the Philippines in 1993, an experience that pushed her to pursue further education and job opportunities in the areas of peace and justice. She applied for an administrative secretary at Eastern Mennonite University’s newly forming Conflict Analysis and Transformation Program (later shortened to Conflict Transformation Program, or CTP). Zimmerman was the first full-time employee of the fledging new academic program in 1994 and went on to become the co-director with Howard Zehr in 2002, remaining in that position until her departure in 2007. Ruth left CJP to join Mennonite Central Committee as a regional area representative, giving leadership to programs in India, Nepal and Afghanistan. After three years, she joined World Vision US as a senior program manager and has had responsibility for both Asian and African development programs. She plans to retire from that position in May of 2020 and return to live in Harrisonburg, Va.


Ann Graber Hershberger and her husband Jim (first CJP cohort graduate) worked with John Paul and Wendy Lederach in Central America in the late 1980’s. In the early 1990’s, then President Joe Lapp asked Ann to chair the faculty committee tasked with writing a proposal for the program that became CJP. That led to a long-term relationship with CJP through the reference committee and later as part of a strategic planning group. Ann has worked in Central America in development, health, relief and peacebuilding for 10 years and, as an EMU faculty, taught community health nursing and cross-cultural studies for over 30 years. She retired as EMU faculty in 2019 and currently works as associate executive director of MCC U.S.


Patricia Hostetter Martin graduated from Goshen College in 1964 with a BA in Social Work. For the next thirty years, she worked with the Mennonite Central Committee –– in Vietnam from 1966–69 and again in 1974–75; in the Philippines from 1979–82; at the Mennonite Central Committee International office from 1984–93, as the East Asia Country Co-Representative with her husband Earl; then again in Vietnam in 1993 as MCC's interim Country Rep. Having lived in situations of extreme conflict many of these years, she was ready for formal training in conflict and thus took mediation training in 1994 and worked as a trainer in schools with the Lancaster Mediation Center in Pennsylvania. In 1995, she took additional courses at George Mason University and others courses taught by John Paul Lederach here at Eastern Mennonite University. In 1996, after the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding was formally founded, she joined the first cohort at CJP, graduating in 1998. Soon the after she helped to direct the fledgling Summer Peacebuilding Institute until her retirement in 2008.


Jan Jenner began her peacebuilding career in the early 1990s while she served in Kenya with Mennonite Central Committee. Realizing she needed more knowledge to become an effective peacebuilding practitioner, she came to EMU to study at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding (CJP). She received her MA in 1999 and shortly began to work at CJP managing grants and peacebuilding practice. During her 17 years of work with CJP, she wrote and managed numerous grants and practice contracts, and was instrumental in developing and managing the Practice and Training Institute, and a number of its innovative programs, including STAR, Coming to the Table, and the Women’s Peacebuilding Leadership Program. Since her retirement from EMU in 2015, Jan has continued her peacebuilding work in local Harrisonburg-area nonprofit organizations.


Janelle Myers-Benner completed studies in justice, peace and conflict studies at EMU in 2001. She began working at CJP in 1999 while finishing her bachelors. Her childhood years in Jackson, MS and time living in Immokalee, Florida and Santa Cruz, Bolivia have been significant parts of her life journey. Since 2005 she has been putting roots down in Keezletown, VA on a 6-acre homestead with her husband, Jason, and daughters Kali, Alida, and Terah, along with the memories of their daughter, Nora, who died in 2008. They are focused on learning to gain their dietary needs from the soil in that place. This is very connected with their desire to find a just way of living. When not working for CJP, she can probably be found in their gardens, tending animals, making cheese or working on some other food-related project.


Carolyn Yoder is a psychotherapist with a private practice specializing in finding courage, healing, and growth amid and after trauma. She was the Founding Director of STAR (Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience), the justice-and-conflict-informed training program begun by CJP after 9/11 that has trained thousands of civil society leaders on six continents amidst crisis, division, and violence. Yoder recently updated The Little Book of Trauma Healing and she offers online resources at www.PeaceAfterTrauma.com. For 18 years, she lived, learned, and worked in East and Southern Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Caucasus. Now home in the United States, her passions include learning to act mindfully from the heart in a turbulent world, playing with her four delightful grandchildren, and caring for the planet they are inheriting.


Kirby Broadnax, moderator

Kirby E Broadnax is a community builder and facilitator from Cleveland, Ohio who aspires to understand the roots of conflict in order to co-create community transformation and healing. She has a bachelor’s degree in Sociology and Women’s Studies from Miami University (OH) and will graduate in 2020 with a master’s in Conflict Transformation from the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding. Among other things, Kirby is interested in community trauma healing and ways that connection to the environment can support our individual and collective well being. She has taught elementary school, worked as a mediator and a shelter diversion advocate, and has planted dozens of trees. Kirby loves creating playlists, thought-provoking conversations, dancing and singing, playing board games, and making cards.


Break / Free Time / Open Space

3:30 – 6 p.m.

Snack

Fellowship Hall, Seminary Building, 3:30 - 4 p.m.


Banquet

Yoder Arena, University Commons, 6 – 8 p.m.

Alicia Garza, keynote speaker, 7 – 7:45 p.m.


Alicia Garza, principal, Black Futures Lab, believes that Black communities deserve what all communities deserve -- to be powerful in every aspect of their lives. An innovator, strategist, organizer, and cheeseburger enthusiast, she is the co-creator of #BlackLivesMatter and the Black Lives Matter Global Network, an international organizing project to end state violence and oppression against Black people. The Black Lives Matter Global Network now has 40 chapters in 4 countries. Alicia also founded the Black Futures Lab to make Black communities powerful in politics. In 2018, the Black Futures Lab conducted the largest survey of Black communities in over 150 years.

Alicia serves as the Strategy & Partnerships Director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance, the nation’s premier voice for millions of domestic workers in the United States. She is also the co-founder of Supermajority, a new home for women’s activism. She shares her thoughts on the women transforming power in Marie Claire magazine every month.

Her forthcoming book, tentatively titled How to Turn a Hashtag Into a Movement will be published in 2020, and she warns you -- hashtags don’t start movements. People do.


Sunday, June 6:


Breakfast

Cafeteria, Northlawn Residence Hall, 7 – 8:30 a.m.


Plenary event III, continuing on theme of racial, economic, social and gender justice

Martin Chapel, Seminary Building, 9 – 10:30 a.m.

All former Executive Director’s Panel



Top row from left: Howard Zehr, Ruth Zimmerman, Vern Jantzi
Bottom row from left: Lynn Roth, Daryl Byler, John Paul Lederach

Howard Zehr, widely known as “the grandfather of restorative justice,” began as a practitioner and theorist in restorative justice in the late 1970s at the foundational stage of the field. He has led hundreds of events and lectured in more than 25 countries and 35 states. A prolific writer and editor, speaker, educator, and photographer, Zehr actively mentors other leaders in the field. His books include Changing Lenses and The Little Book of Restorative Justice, both highly influential in the field, as well as photo/interview books such as Doing Life: Reflections of Men and Women Serving Life Sentences and Transcending, Reflections of Crime Victims. He was the initiator of The Little Books of Justice and Peacebuilding series. Zehr joined CJP in 1996 and in 2013 stepped away from active classroom teaching. He remains involved with the Zehr Institute of Restorative Justice. Before coming to EMU, he directed the Mennonite Central Committee U.S. Office of Criminal Justice.


Vernon Jantzi, PhD in Sociology, helped found CJP and directed/co-directed the program from 1995-2002. While working with the Costa Rican “Land Reform” program in the early 80s he discovered and denounced to the US National Security Council and the House Subcommittee on Hemispheric Affairs the US-funded covert insurgency against the Nicaraguan Revolution from Costa Rica. Dr. Jantzi helped write the first academic curriculum for the University for Peace with Francisco Barahona and later EMU’s Conflict Transformation Program with John Paul Lederach. He led the feasibility study for EMU’s Center for Interfaith Engagement and coordinated its early program activities. In 2000-01 he lived in New Zealand as a Massey University Scholar in Residence where he and his wife, Dorothy, wrote a history of Restorative Justice in the country. Since 2009 Dr. Jantzi has focused on peacebuilding-and-justice-informed psycho-social work with CJP’s STAR Program—Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience.


Lynn Roth served as Executive Director of CJP from August 2007 to June 2013. Prior to that he served with Mennonite Central Committee for thirty-three years, including from 1989 to 2007 as Executive Director of MCC East Coast. From 2013 to 2018, he was the North America Representative for Mennonite World Conference. Roth retired from Mennonite World Conference in May 2018. From September 1, 2019 to January, 2020 he and his wife Kathleen completed a short term MCC assignment living in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, helping to write a simple English language curriculum to be used by volunteers in preparation for the Mennonite World Conference Assembly in Indonesia in 2021.


Daryl Byler has four delightful grandchildren – Sydney, Kiara, Jesse and Davey – who help keep his spirit young. He enjoys running, reading, journaling, and exploring Washington, DC where he lives with Cindy Lehman Byler, his spouse and soulmate for the past 40 years. Together, they enjoy hosting groups in their home and taking walks. They have three adult children. Daryl currently spends his days at the DC Bar Foundation, working to transform the civil legal aid network in Washington, DC so that the city’s most vulnerable residents – persons facing eviction from their homes, loss of jobs, discrimination, deportation or domestic abuse – have access to justice and quality legal representation. His previous work includes being a legal aid attorney, a pastor, an advocacy office director, international development administrator, and executive director at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding.


John Paul Lederach is Professor Emeritus of International Peacebuilding at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame and Senior Fellow at Humanity United. He works extensively as a practitioner in conciliation processes, active in Latin America, Africa, Southeast and Central Asia. He is widely known for the development of culturally appropriate approaches to conflict transformation and the design and implementation of integrative and strategic approaches to peacebuilding. He served as the director of the Peace Accord Matrix research initiative at the Kroc Institute and is active as a member of the Advisory Council for the recently formed Truth Commission in Colombia. He is author and editor of 24 books and manuals, including Building Peace: Sustainable Reconciliation in Divided Societies (US Institute of Peace Press) and The Moral Imagination: The Art and Soul of Building Peace (Oxford University Press).


Tim Seidel, moderator

Timothy Seidel is assistant professor in the Department of Applied Social Sciences and the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding. He also serves as director for the Center for Interfaith Engagement (CIE), a center that promotes collaboration among scholars and practitioners and partners with community and national organizations to build a more just and peaceful world through interreligious and intercultural understanding.




Break

Fellowship Hall, Seminary Building, 10:30 – 11 a.m.


Closing ceremony

Martin Chapel, Seminary Building, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

In Memoriam, 11-11:15 a.m.

Closing Ceremony led by Katie Mansfield, Katia Ornelas Nunez and Ram Bhagat


Lunch and check out

Cafeteria, Northlawn Residence Hall, 12 – 2 p.m.



CJP Registration

Past Events - October 2019



EMUTenTalks (Special 25th CJP anniversary edition) | Celebrate. Reflect. Dream.

October 12 - MainStage Theater, University Common, 2 p.m.

During EMU's Homecoming and Family Weekend, EMUTenTalks focused on CJP's anniversary theme “Celebrate, Reflect, Dream.” Inspiring 10-minute presentations were made by three transformative peacebuilders, followed by Q&A. The TenTalks were moderated by Liza Heavener ‘07.


John E. Sharp, father of Michael J. Sharp '05, historian, storyteller, Kilimanjaro "dream hiker," recently retired as history and Bible professor at Hesston College in Kansas after 13 years of teaching. He spends his time researching and writing, leading Anabaptist and Mennonite history tours to Europe and Central Asia, and promoting peacebuilding. Sharp is also a caretaker for the work and life story of his son, United Nations Armed Group Expert Michael J. “MJ” Sharp, who was murdered on March 12, 2017, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.


Tammy Krause MA ‘99, restorative justice pioneer in defense-victim outreach has worked on federal death penalty cases throughout the United States for the past two decades. She is the national defense-victim outreach coordinator for the Federal Death Penalty Resource Counsel Project. Krause pioneered the legal profession’s defense-victim outreach, which seeks to establish relationships between the defense attorneys and survivors and victims’ family members of violent crime in an effort to bridge the historical gap between the two. Krause holds a PhD from the University of Manchester School of Law in England and a master’s degree in conflict transformation from the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University.


Darsheel Kaur MA ‘17 is an educator, cultural worker and artist, youth advocate and restorative practitioner. As a Punjabi immigrant, a student of Sikhi and a woman of color, she draws strength and courage from her identities and uplifts the beauty and opportunities in diversity. She completed her undergraduate degree at Wright State University in organizational leadership with minors in youth and community engagement and Spanish. She graduated with a master’s degree in conflict transformation from the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University, focusing on restorative justice/racial justice and psycho-social trauma and resilience.


CJP AT 25 GATHERING

October 12 - Common Grounds, University Common, 3 p.m.

View the CJP at 25 Gathering photo gallery.



Past Events - February 2020

SPI Community Day

February 14 - Martin Chapel, Seminary Building at EMU, 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Learn more.



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