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‘Candid Camera’ Exhibit in Library Art Gallery Through Feb. 6

Posted on January 27th, 2010

Photography by Scott Jost
’10.10.07 (Print Critique, Chemical Darkroom Photography Class)’ by Scott Jost

The aspiration, "to see myself as others see me," has, to some extent, come to fruition for Scott Jost of Bridgewater, Va.

Jost, an associate professor of art at Bridgewater College, began a project in 2006 he calls "Teaching Through the Lens." This "work in progress" will be displayed in a photography exhibit currently on display through Feb. 6 in the public art gallery at EMU.

Jost has photographed himself and others in the college classroom while teaching and during formal and informal interactions involving students and colleagues. Other images include the Bridgewater College campus, his home life and interactions with family. He began the project on the anniversary of his tenth year of full-time teaching.

Jost captured the photographs in his exhibit with a Fuji FinePix F10 and F30, and Richoh GX100 and GX200, compact cameras he carries on his belt.

He took an informal approach to composition reminiscent of a genre known as street photography, with many images recorded "blind" without looking directly into the camera display.

"This venture will continue over time in order to experience constancy and change in myself and my family, in students and colleagues and, perhaps in the nature of academic life itself," Jost said. "I intend to use this project in creating a better, richer life for myself and in becoming a better teacher, colleague and family member. I believe ‘Teaching through the Lens’ will also be of interest to others wishing to reflect on teaching, learning and academic life."

Jost earned a BA degree from Bethel College, N. Newton, Kan., and an MFA degree from the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis. Before going to Bridgewater College he taught in the art department at EMU, 1996-2003.

The exhibit, in the third floor art gallery of EMU’s Hartzler Library, is open for viewing daily free of charge during regular library hours, and admission is free.

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