Distance Learning Online at EMS

Eastern Mennonite Seminary has offered online courses for over a decade in the areas of Anabaptist theology, church history, and the practice of ministry (pastoral care, missional church, and leadership). More than a dozen online courses are offered on a two-year cycle, with several course offerings each semester as well as during the summer.

Apply | Request information | About online studies at EMS
Class format | Technical requirements to get started

Interested in learning on the land and sea of the Bible? Check out: The BLESS program | The Samuel Grant

Tuition

Tuition for online and hybrid courses is the same tuition as courses on EMS main campus in Harrisonburg, Va. Online and hybrid courses may be available for participation audit. To learn more about our audit policy for online and hybrid classes email semadmiss@emu.edu

Registration

Students who have already filled out an application may register by emailing the seminary registrar, Beth Brunk.

Fall 2018 Hybrid Courses

BVNT 641 Gospel of Luke/Book of Acts

This course focuses on the Gospel of Luke and/or the Book of Acts (English text). Beginning with inductive study of the Lukan text(s), the course concludes with consideration of “critical questions” (authorship, purpose, original readership, historical/social/cultural context). Special attention is given to the question of synoptic relationships (Luke) and the “history vs. theology” question (Luke/Acts). Primary emphasis lies on the final literary form of Luke/Acts and the characteristically Lukan “story of Jesus and the early church” recounted in these writings. The course approaches the text in both sequential and thematic fashion.

  • Instructor: Dr. Lareta Finger
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Schedule: On-campus August 20-24 8 a.m.-12 p.m., online to end of semester

 

CM 542 Psychology of Religion

Many seminary courses examine theological perspectives of various realities. This course takes a unique vantage point on spiritual and religious realities by examining them from a psychological perspective. Topics considered include spiritual and religious experience in childhood and adulthood, death, conversion, mysticism, and prayer as well as social and political dimensions of faith experience. A central dimension of the course is the sharing of faith vignettes by members of the class. Opportunity is also given to explore the cultural dimensions of religious experience.

  • Instructor: Dr. Lonnie Yoder
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Schedule: On-campus August 20-24, 1-5 p.m., online to end of semester

 

FS 701 Form in Missional Leadership I

  • Instructor: Dr. Brenda Martin Hurst
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Schedule: On campus, October 5-6, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; online components througout semester

This course serves as a two-semester long capstone experience for all Master of Divinity students. In the course students will: 1) continue and deepen the formational work begun in the earlier formation courses (Formation in God’s Story and Formation in Ministry); 2) participate in direct assessment experiences related to the four guiding principles of the curriculum (wise interpretation, mature practice, discerning communication, and transformational leadership), 3) identify and embrace a missional understanding of leadership, and 4) focus on the transitional dynamics associated with finishing a seminary course of study and engaging a new context for life and ministry.

Formation in God’s Story I

Formation in God’s Story I is the first in a series of formation classes, each of which offers a different focus as students attend to their personal, spiritual, and ministry formation while in seminary. This basic course provides time and space for students to pay prayerful attention to their formational journey through listening to their life narrative from birth until the present. Along with this picture of story-listening they will also locate their personal story in the larger picture of God’s story as recorded in scripture. Through reading, meditation, and biblical story-telling, they will internalize the flow of God’s salvation story and attend to how God’s story speaks to their own. Interwoven with these practices, they will also discern and reflect on God’s presence and action in their life, meeting in guided small group sessions for listening and soul care.

  • Instructor: Dr. Lonnie Yoder
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Schedule: On-campus January 7-11, 1-5 p.m.; online until end of spring semester

CTH 501 Christian Tradition I

An overview of ways in which the Christian church has attempted to live and express its faith in various cultures from the second century to the Reformation. Special attention is given to developments in worship and in theological reflection and to the significance of these in particular social and historical contexts. Additional resourcing in writing and research is provided for students at the beginning of their seminary studies.

  • Instructor: Dr. David Evans
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Schedule: On-campus January 7-11, 8 a.m. -12 p.m, online until end of spring semester

FS 702 Formation in Missional Leadership II 

  • Instructor: Dr. Brenda Martin Hurst
  • Credit Hours: 2
  • Schedule: On campus, TBD.; online components througout semester

This course serves as a two-semester long capstone experience for all Master of Divinity students. In the course students will: 1) continue and deepen the formational work begun in the earlier formation courses (Formation in God’s Story and Formation in Ministry); 2) participate in direct assessment experiences related to the four guiding principles of the curriculum (wise interpretation, mature practice, discerning communication, and transformational leadership), 3) identify and embrace a missional understanding of leadership, and 4) focus on the transitional dynamics associated with finishing a seminary course of study and engaging a new context for life and ministry.

Spring Online Courses

New Testament: Text in Context

This course is a basic introduction to the study of the New Testament. It focuses on the historical/social/cultural/theological worlds of the New Testament Scriptures in order to discover the context out of which the Scriptures have grown and the communities to which they are addressed. The course works at these questions by means of inductive exercises which introduce a variety of methodological approaches: historical, sociological, redactional, literary. Attention likewise is given (1) to the concepts of canon and inspiration and (2) to the range of contemporary settings within which the biblical text is read and understood.

  • Instructor: Dr. Dorothy Jean Weaver
  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Schedule: August 29-Dec 15
Sem Logo Seminary
Apply for Eastern Mennonite Seminary


Summer Institute for Spiritual Formation

Latest News

  • Loading...

SOCIAL HUB

  • Loading...