Peace Activist Art Gish Killed in Farm Accident

July 28th, 2010 – by Jeremy W. Yoder, Editors Blog

(updated below)

Peace activist Art Gish died this morning in a tragic farm accident when his tractor flipped over and caught fire. He was 70.  See Athens County peace activist killed in farming accident in the Columbus Dispatch.

Art was most recently known for his work in Hebron with Christian Peacemaker Teams, lending his years of peacemaking experience to volatile region. He served as a conscientious objector in Europe with Brethren Volunteer Services and was active in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960′s. He worked as a street preacher, co-founded People for Peace and Students for Peace and authored several books on peacemaking and simple living.

Journalist and activist Rose Marie Berger has a tribute to Art on her blog.

As a teenager, I was deeply influenced by his book, Beyond the Rat Race, a matter-of-fact guide to simple, counter-cultural sustainable living written back in the 1970′s.

Art was a pioneer and prophet, who embodied the biblical call to justice in his day-to-day life. He will be missed.

UPDATE: Art’s son, Dale, has created a Facebook memorial page. According to Dale, a memorial service will be held for Art on August 7, in the basement of the First United Methodist  Church in Athens, Ohio at 2 pm.  See page for details

This entry was posted on Wednesday, July 28th, 2010 at 10:54 pm. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

2 Responses to “Peace Activist Art Gish Killed in Farm Accident”

  1. Mark Keller Says:

    I am very sad to learn of Art’s death. He spoke at my college in the 70’s when many were loosing faith that Christians could appose the principles that seemed un-Christ like. He inspired persons to remain in the faith.

  2. Nancy Dezio Says:

    I was deeply saddened to hear of the tragic death of Art Gish. I am not from Athens, but have been visiting family here since 1997 and had the pleasure of meeting Art a few times and viewing him from afar and was always struck by his humble presence. He seemed to be a very HUGE figure in the Athens scene, as well as internationally over the years. It is very difficult to lose such a hero and someone who was so admired by many. I am sure his legacy will live on.
    Sincerely,
    Nancy Dezio