Why I’m [Still] Mennonite – Hope and Peace

July 19th, 2010 – by Laura Church, July 2010

Laura ChurchI am still a Mennonite because of the Presbyterians.

On a daily basis, I am surrounded by gun shots, drug deals on my front stoop, and questions from the police over whether my husband and I are lost as we pull up outside of our row home in Baltimore.  The adjustment to life in my neighborhood was difficult for me. Just a few months after moving there, I felt frustrated with my neighbors, sad that anyone had to live in this situation, and tired of seeing people make destructive life choices. I saw little hope for those around me, and wasn’t sure what “peace” was anymore. I wanted to move, and often retreated into my house to avoid my neighbors. However, both my husband and I felt a deep sense of call to live in this neighborhood. We realized that we needed a community with a similar sense of call in order for this to work.

We began looking for this community at church. I was surprised to find myself drawn to a Presbyterian community near where we live. I was raised in the Mennonite Church, and as an adult, I continue to hold to its values and commitments. I felt skeptical that I would find what I looked for in this community. However, on the first Sunday we visited, I knew I had found a place that truly sought and followed the footsteps of Christ. We found a rainbow of people worshiping together. The pastor talked extensively about core values of the church: Reconciliation, Redistribution, and Relocation. He spoke on the importance of living among those you serve, share resources, and bringing together groups of people who would not normally interact. I realized everyone in that service lived in the neighborhood and came from a variety of backgrounds. Some had grown up locally, and some were transplants. Some continued to struggle with their daily needs, while others had never known poverty. However, they all were committed to loving each other and providing for each other’s needs. They knew each other, loved each other, and lived their lives together as one body. I found hope in their commitment to each other and discipleship to Christ. While they would not consider themselves a “peace church,” I saw persons working for peace more clearly than ever before.

I no longer desire to move. I learned that in order to love my neighbors, I must know my neighbors. Instead of watching my neighbors from my house and feeling frustrated, I now spend my time sitting on my front stoop talking to them, helping people apply for social security or unemployment, pumping up balls and tires for the children, or having a family over for dinner. I still have some of the same frustrations that I did before, but I see my neighbors differently. They are now my family, people I love, and the idea of leaving them breaks my heart. I learned that to provide hope and peace for those around me, I must know them, live with them, and share in their daily life struggles. I also learned that not only do I have something to offer them, but they have something to offer me. I am regularly loved, called family, and looked after by my neighbors. I no longer work for hope and peace for my neighbors — we now work together to find hope and peace for the neighborhood. Ω

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4 Responses to “Why I’m [Still] Mennonite – Hope and Peace”

  1. David Bartow Says:

    Laura, I enjoyed reading your blog. I’ve been wondering how things are going with you. It sounds as though you are really involved in your neighborhood. Blessings to you and Asa as you continue to serve God there.

  2. eldon kurtz Says:

    Laura,
    Kudos and blessings to you and Asa. Thanks for your part of building the Kingdom that many of us miss. You are doing what I’ve dreamed about and work toward for 30+ years. However, in H’bg with all the good Mennonite connections and projects it has been easy to miss being present with our neighbors while choosing to live in the neighborhood. I’m encouraged to spend more time on the front porch.

  3. Phil Kniss Says:

    Laura, thanks so much for writing this. Your testimony is an inspiration, and I trust you won’t mind me sharing it around a bit here at your home congregation, Park View. You are missed here, but so glad you and Asa are incarnating the Kingdom of God in Baltimore.

  4. Cindy Smoker Says:

    Really enjoyed this piece. Refreshing thoughts about what it means to be a neighbor. Thanks for inspiring me, Laura.