“Embracing Missional Shalom Community” – Dr. Randy Woodley

& Augsburger Lecture Series, Chapel Gathering in the Seminary, Seminary.

What does missional shalom community look like? In this Chapel Gathering of the Augsburger Lecture Series, consider the perspectives of Randy Woodley, from Eagle’s Wings Ministry, and the teaching of Luke 15.

Randy Woodley is an author, missiologist, activist-scholar, former pastor and innovator. In over 35 years of grassroots ministry he has founded or helped to form organizations such as Christians for Justice, Eagle Valley Church, Eagle’s Wings Ministry, American Indian Environment and Health Association, North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies, Evangelicals 4 Justice, Eloheh Village for Indigenous Leadership and Ministry Development and Eloheh Farm. His most recent book is Shalom and the Community of Creation: An Indigenous Vision (2012). Randy is legal descendent of the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees and has been involved in Indigenous ministry for 28 years. Currently, Dr. Woodley serves as Distinguished Professor of Faith and Culture, Director of Intercultural and Indigenous Studies and Program Director NAIITS Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies at George Fox Seminary in Portland, Oregon. He achieved a Master of Divinity degree from Eastern Seminary, is ordained by the American Baptist Churches, and is received his PhD. in Inter-cultural Studies at Asbury Seminary.

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The Augsburger Lectureship provides resources to annually bring to the campus of the college and seminary a noted lecturer to address pertinent topics in the area of Christian evangelism and mission for the stimulation and development of a vision for evangelism and missions for the students, faculty and staff of Eastern Mennonite University.

The entire campus community is invited to every chapel service on campus. Eastern Mennonite Seminary hosts chapel gatherings in Martin Chapel every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 11:00.

Seminary Capstone Presentation – Jonathan Swartz

& Seminary, Seminary Senior Capstone, Student Speakers.

Jonathan Swartz,
Surprised by Hoping In/For Conflict?

Students in the seminary’s Master of Divinity program complete Capstone Integration Projects across the two semesters of their senior year. During the fall semester, they negotiate with the professors in the Formation in Missional Leadership class the design of their projects. They then complete their projects in the spring, producing a final paper and making a public presentation.

“Embracing Missional Shalom Community” – Dr. Randy Woodley

& Augsburger Lecture Series, University Chapels.

What does missional shalom community look like? In this opening chapel of the Augsburger Lecture Series, consider the perspectives of Randy Woodley, from Eagle’s Wings Ministry, and the teaching of Luke 15.

Randy Woodley is an author, missiologist, activist-scholar, former pastor and innovator. In over 35 years of grassroots ministry he has founded or helped to form organizations such as Christians for Justice, Eagle Valley Church, Eagle’s Wings Ministry, American Indian Environment and Health Association, North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies, Evangelicals 4 Justice, Eloheh Village for Indigenous Leadership and Ministry Development and Eloheh Farm. His most recent book is Shalom and the Community of Creation: An Indigenous Vision (2012). Randy is legal descendent of the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees and has been involved in Indigenous ministry for 28 years. Currently, Dr. Woodley serves as Distinguished Professor of Faith and Culture, Director of Intercultural and Indigenous Studies and Program Director NAIITS Master of Arts in Intercultural Studies at George Fox Seminary in Portland, Oregon. He achieved a Master of Divinity degree from Eastern Seminary, is ordained by the American Baptist Churches, and is received his PhD. in Inter-cultural Studies at Asbury Seminary.

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The Augsburger Lectureship provides resources to annually bring to the campus of the college and seminary a noted lecturer to address pertinent topics in the area of Christian evangelism and mission for the stimulation and development of a vision for evangelism and missions for the students, faculty and staff of Eastern Mennonite University.

Inside Athletics: March 6, 2014

& Faculty/Staff Speakers, Inside Athletics.

In this week’s “Inside Athletics” podcast, Dave and James come up for air after last week’s busy stretch with the ODAC Basketball Tournaments.  They give some recapping thoughts on the basketball tournaments, as well as the ODAC Indoor Tack & Field Championships, which were also last weekend.  Other topics include David Falk and EMU’s 15 Seconds Of Fame on ESPN a few weeks ago, as well as Dave skimming the surface on the current hot topic of “one-and-done” student-athletes in college.

Inside Athletics is a weekly podcast hosted by Director of Athletics, Dave King. The podcast offers a synopsis of what is happening in EMU athletics, but also delves deeper into how athletics at EMU shapes lives and enhances college educations by positively impacting an athlete’s understanding of self, others, and God. Sports Information Director James De Boer is a regular guest with EMU coaches and athletes making appearances as well.

Inside Athletics: February 28, 2014

& University Chapels.

In this week’s “Inside Athletics” podcast, Dave and James talk live from the ODAC Basketball Tournaments in Salem, Va., where both the men and the women have advanced into the semifinals.  They give an overview of the tournament, which has featured a few upsets already, and then talk about all that’s going on on this busy weekend, both in Harrisonburg and around the stats.

Inside Athletics is a weekly podcast hosted by Director of Athletics, Dave King. The podcast offers a synopsis of what is happening in EMU athletics, but also delves deeper into how athletics at EMU shapes lives and enhances college educations by positively impacting an athlete’s understanding of self, others, and God. Sports Information Director James De Boer is a regular guest with EMU coaches and athletes making appearances as well.

“Mennonite Economic Development Association (MEDA)” – Faith Patrick

& University Chapels.

Faith Patrick, director of the Mennonite Economic Development Association (MEDA) net voucher program in Tanzania, shares about ministry through business ventures. Chapel concludes with a time of sending for students going on spring break Y-Trips.

“Martin Luther King’s Choices and Ours” – Dr. Vincent Harding

& Chapel Gathering in the Seminary, Seminary.

Dr. Vincent Harding engages a discussion around the themes of a quote by MLK and Matthew 25: 31 -40.

I choose to identify with the underprivileged.
I choose to identify with the poor.
I choose to give my life for the hungry.
I choose to give my life for those who have been left out of the sunlight of opportunity.
I choose to live for and with those who find themselves seeing life as a long and desolate corridor with no exit sign.
This is the way I’m going.
If it means suffering a little bit, I’m going that way.
If it means sacrificing, I’m going that way.
If it means dying for them, I’m going that way, because
I heard a voice saying, ‘Do something for others.’
           -Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.
Dr. Vincent Harding is a celebrated Civil Rights leader and scholar who was a close associate of Martin Luther King Jr. and the first director of the King Center in Atlanta. Harding also worked closely with Mennonites during the early 1960s, directing the “Mennonite House” in Atlanta from 1961-1964. In 1967, Harding drafted King’s important and controversial “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam” speech. He is the author of several books on the Civil Rights Movement, was the senior academic advisor for the PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize” series, and in 1997 he founded the Veterans of Hope Project which collects the stories of people who dedicated their lives to compassionate social change. In 2011 he engaged in a panel with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Sister Helen Prejean and this inspired his 2013 book, America Will Be!: Conversations on Hope, Freedom, and Democracy, co-authored with Buddhist leader Daisaku Ikeda.
The entire campus community is invited to every chapel service on campus. Eastern Mennonite Seminary hosts chapel gatherings in Martin Chapel every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 11:00.

“Is America Possible?” – Dr. Vincent Harding

& University Chapels.

In this evening lecture, Dr. Harding, a friend and confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., presents a guided discussion based on his years of experience with the Civil Rights movement, and on his recent thinking about compassion and the many forms of non-violent expression for social change.

Dr. Vincent Harding is a celebrated Civil Rights leader and scholar who was a close associate of Martin Luther King Jr. and the first director of the King Center in Atlanta. Harding also worked closely with Mennonites during the early 1960s, directing the “Mennonite House” in Atlanta from 1961-1964. In 1967, Harding drafted King’s important and controversial “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam” speech. He is the author of several books on the Civil Rights Movement, was the senior academic advisor for the PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize” series, and in 1997 he founded the Veterans of Hope Project which collects the stories of people who dedicated their lives to compassionate social change. In 2011 he engaged in a panel with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Sister Helen Prejean and this inspired his 2013 book, America Will Be!: Conversations on Hope, Freedom, and Democracy, co-authored with Buddhist leader Daisaku Ikeda.

“Loved into Life: a personal testimony” – Dr. Vincent Harding

& University Chapels.

The EMU history department and Black Student Union host Dr. Vincent Harding to share from his life and faith journey as part of the Keim Lecture Series and Black History Month. Dr. Harding was a friend and close associate of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and a Mennonite pastor who visited EMU during the Civil Rights era. We are honored to again host him on campus.

Dr. Harding, a friend and confidant of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., presents a guided discussion based on his years of experience with the Civil Rights movement, and on his recent thinking about compassion and the many forms of non-violent expression for social change.

Dr. Vincent Harding is a celebrated Civil Rights leader and scholar who was a close associate of Martin Luther King Jr. and the first director of the King Center in Atlanta. Harding also worked closely with Mennonites during the early 1960s, directing the “Mennonite House” in Atlanta from 1961-1964. In 1967, Harding drafted King’s important and controversial “Why I am Opposed to the War in Vietnam” speech. He is the author of several books on the Civil Rights Movement, was the senior academic advisor for the PBS documentary “Eyes on the Prize” series, and in 1997 he founded the Veterans of Hope Project which collects the stories of people who dedicated their lives to compassionate social change. In 2011 he engaged in a panel with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Sister Helen Prejean and this inspired his 2013 book, America Will Be!: Conversations on Hope, Freedom, and Democracy, co-authored with Buddhist leader Daisaku Ikeda.

“Rock. Lichen. Forest: Representing Biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest” – Steven Johnson

& University Colloquium Series.

Associate professor Steven Johnson, gives a presentation on his 12-13 sabbatical entitled “Rock. Lichen. Forest: Representing Biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest.”